Pet Animals – Joli Jaunter http://jolijaunter.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:33:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jolijaunter.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Pet Animals – Joli Jaunter http://jolijaunter.com/ 32 32 Rabid raccoon confirmed in Haddon Heights https://jolijaunter.com/rabid-raccoon-confirmed-in-haddon-heights/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:24:08 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/rabid-raccoon-confirmed-in-haddon-heights/ (Gloucester Township, NJ) – The Camden County Health Department has been notified by the New Jersey Department of Health and Human Services (NJDHHS) that a raccoon removed from a yard in Haddon Heights has been tested positive for rabies. On June 23, a deceased raccoon was found in the yard of a Haddon Heights home […]]]>

(Gloucester Township, NJ) – The Camden County Health Department has been notified by the New Jersey Department of Health and Human Services (NJDHHS) that a raccoon removed from a yard in Haddon Heights has been tested positive for rabies.

On June 23, a deceased raccoon was found in the yard of a Haddon Heights home by the resident. No contact was observed between the family dog ​​and the raccoon. The Haddon Heights Animal Control Officer (ACO) picked up the raccoon and arranged for rabies testing at the State Public and Environmental Health Laboratories in Trenton (PHEL).

There is no known human exposure to this raccoon.

On June 28, the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services was notified by PHEL that the animal was rabid.

The ACO associated with Haddon Heights and pet owners have been notified. The owners have provided proof of vaccination for the dog, he has received a rabies booster and will be under confinement and observation for 45 days.

“Fortunately, there was no human exposure in this case and the family dog ​​also appears to have avoided contact,” said curator-manager Louis Cappelli Jr. “Although rabies is a serious disease , the disease can be prevented by early treatment, so if you have been bitten or scratched by a wild animal, it is important that you seek medical attention immediately.

Cappelli urged county residents to observe a few simple rules, including acting responsibly as a pet owner:

  1. Keep vaccinations up to date for all dogs, cats and ferrets.
  2. Keep your pets under direct supervision so they do not come into contact with wild animals. If your pet is bitten by a wild animal, seek veterinary assistance for the animal immediately.
  3. Contact your local animal control agency to remove all stray animals from your neighborhood. They may not be vaccinated and be infected with the disease.

Cappelli said it was also important to avoid direct contact with unfamiliar animals:

  1. Appreciate wildlife such as raccoons, skunks and foxes from afar. Do not handle, feed or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or a liter.
  2. Never adopt wild animals and never bring them into your home. Do not attempt to treat sick animals. Call animal control or an animal rescue agency for assistance.
  3. Teach children never to handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they seem friendly.
  4. Prevent bats from entering dwellings or occupied spaces in homes, churches, schools and other similar places where they may come into contact with people or pets.
  5. When traveling abroad, avoid direct contact with wild animals and be especially careful with dogs in developing countries. Rabies is common in developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Tens of thousands of people die each year from rabies in these countries.

Cappelli said interested residents can learn more about rabies via the Internet by accessing information available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/rabies/ or, residents can call the Camden County Department of Health and Human Services at 856-374-6370.

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Southern Pines Animal Shelter Encourages Pet Adoption https://jolijaunter.com/southern-pines-animal-shelter-encourages-pet-adoption/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 00:02:00 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/southern-pines-animal-shelter-encourages-pet-adoption/ PINE BELT, Miss. (WDAM) – More animals tend to be dropped off at shelters during the summer months, leading to shelters like Southern Pines Animal Shelter full of pets in need of homes. However, for those who wish to welcome a four-legged friend into their home but cannot take on full-time responsibility, there is still […]]]>

PINE BELT, Miss. (WDAM) – More animals tend to be dropped off at shelters during the summer months, leading to shelters like Southern Pines Animal Shelter full of pets in need of homes.

However, for those who wish to welcome a four-legged friend into their home but cannot take on full-time responsibility, there is still an option.

Sarah Krock, community engagement manager for Southern Pines, says fostering an animal might be the best bet.

“Placement is extremely important, especially during the summer when we see the greatest influx of animals, especially minor animals,” Krock said. “No matter what we do, no matter how hard we try, the shelter just isn’t the best place for pets. We know it can be stressful.

“The best place is the home, and so, for animals that need more intensive or more round-the-clock care, like underage kittens, foster homes in particular are life-saving and life-changing.”

Krock says fostering also helps animals get used to living in a home, which is the goal of every animal in the shelter.

“There’s nothing better than snuggling up a kitten or a puppy, even if it’s just a few nights in a house to get them where they need to go,” Krock said. “For many animals, this can be short-term, like a few nights or a weekend.

“For some of our pets who are really young, like those who are a few weeks old, or moms with nursing babies, we may ask if you’re able to keep them for a few weeks.”

Fostering with Southern Pines Animal Shelter is free, Krock said. The shelter also provides animal medical supplies and care.

“Even though a lot of people may be afraid of fostering because of the emotional investment, it’s so rewarding and so worth it,” Krock said. “The ability to find just a little space and time in your life for animals in need is so rewarding and impactful.

“For me, personally, that’s how I started here.”

For those wishing to foster an animal, visit Southern Pines Foster Care Facebook group or visit the Pins du Sud website.

Copyright 2022 WDAM. All rights reserved.

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Firefighter charged with animal cruelty accused of illegally euthanizing a pet https://jolijaunter.com/firefighter-charged-with-animal-cruelty-accused-of-illegally-euthanizing-a-pet/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 23:29:36 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/firefighter-charged-with-animal-cruelty-accused-of-illegally-euthanizing-a-pet/ JACKSONVILLE, Florida. – Disclaimer: Some may find the details in this article to be graphical in nature. Discretion advised. A Jacksonville firefighter faces criminal charges after investigators say he illegally euthanized a pet. Jacob Tomlinson, 35, was charged with aggravated animal cruelty, unlawfully discharging a firearm and unlawful euthanasia. Because Tomlinson is a firefighter, his […]]]>

JACKSONVILLE, Florida.Disclaimer: Some may find the details in this article to be graphical in nature. Discretion advised.

A Jacksonville firefighter faces criminal charges after investigators say he illegally euthanized a pet.

Jacob Tomlinson, 35, was charged with aggravated animal cruelty, unlawfully discharging a firearm and unlawful euthanasia. Because Tomlinson is a firefighter, his photo ID is exempt from being made public.

Investigators say it was in the backyard of a Mandarin house where Tomlinson brought his dog to perform an illegal act of euthanasia by repeatedly shooting the dog.

A neighbor, who called police and spoke to News4JAX on condition of anonymity, said she was in her room when she heard the gunshots.

“I heard three loud noises. I walked out and that’s when I heard a fourth pop,” she said. “At that time, my dad came out and spoke with the neighbor who owned the house, and he said everything was fine.”

A d

According to the arrest warrant, the owner of the house was Tomlinson’s father. The woman said she went to her kitchen window to get a better look.

“I saw this white and brown spotted pit bull struggling to stand. It almost looked like he was playing, but then he lay down and started shaking violently,” she said.

She said Tomlinson stood over the dog, then walked away.

“That’s when I started recording, and the dog was just sitting there, shaking violently, and I could see blood pouring out of his chest,” she said.

She said she recorded this video of Tomlinson digging a hole in the ground. Investigators said this is where he buried the dog, and according to the arrest report, the dog may have still been alive when he was buried.

The arrest report says Tomlinson told police he shot and killed the dog because it acted aggressively over the past year and bit four people, including his neighbor earlier in the day after stepping out of the backyard. He also told police he spent a lot of money training his dog.

A d

“I’m sorry, but there are more humane ways to do it,” the woman said. “There are shelters where he could have taken the dog that would have taken him. He could have euthanized at a veterinarian if he had not been able to go to a shelter. He didn’t need to shoot him four times in the chest and watch him suffer.

An animal control officer took over the investigation and deemed Tomlinson’s actions to be inhumane and unnecessary, then recommended criminal charges.

A spokesperson for the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department said when personnel face legal issues, they are placed on administrative duty while the matter is investigated.

Copyright 2022 by WJXT News4JAX – All Rights Reserved.

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Kansas City Homeless Resist Abandoning Pets in Searing Heat: ‘It’s Not Loyalty’ | KCUR 89.3 https://jolijaunter.com/kansas-city-homeless-resist-abandoning-pets-in-searing-heat-its-not-loyalty-kcur-89-3/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/kansas-city-homeless-resist-abandoning-pets-in-searing-heat-its-not-loyalty-kcur-89-3/ David Murphy lives in his car with his two pit bulls, when Kansas City gets as hot as it has been lately, he has to take inventive measures. To create some extra shade, he built a makeshift tent using tarps attached to his Chevy Malibu. “When it’s too hot, I just suffer with them,” Murphy […]]]>

David Murphy lives in his car with his two pit bulls, when Kansas City gets as hot as it has been lately, he has to take inventive measures.

To create some extra shade, he built a makeshift tent using tarps attached to his Chevy Malibu.

“When it’s too hot, I just suffer with them,” Murphy says. “We sweat and drink water together. Literally, we’ve been sitting in the heat together like, ‘Well, you do. I do.’ “

Kansas City’s homeless population struggles enough with the sweltering heat, but those with pets are doubly responsible for caring for their four-legged companions.

Most homeless shelters and cooling centers around town don’t allow pets inside, leaving pet owners with few options. Pets create a host of concerns for shelters, including bites, hygiene, and allergies.

Chance Dulin, adult outreach specialist at the agency for the homeless to restartsays most homeless residents are reluctant to give up their pets, in part for the sake of getting them back.

“That’s extreme loyalty,” Dulin says. “Their pets have proven to be loyal to them, so they feel like they should be loyal to their pet.”

But Murphy says that because people don’t want to part with their pet, they put themselves and their pets at risk, especially in brutal weather conditions.

KC Pet Project has created a service called “Home Away From Home“, which allows owners of animals in crisis to temporarily abandon their animals so that they can be taken care of at the shelter or in a foster family.

In addition to extreme weather conditions, Tori Fugate at KC Pet Project says the recent financial crisis, housing upheavals and the pandemic have created the need for temporary animal placements.

“We heard of people who ultimately lost their lives because they had no place to go,” Fugate says. “Every time he hits those extreme temperatures, whether it’s hot or cold, we see him in the cold more often. People just don’t have options.

Carlos Moreno

/

KCUR 89.3

David Murphy describes how he and his pit bulls sweat in hot weather under tarps that cover his car parked near reStart.

Murphy, 42, has owned Felony and Red Dog for three years. Near his makeshift tent at 9th Street and Harrison, he also improvised a dog race with their leashes tied to a cord running along a fence. Bowls of dry dog ​​food and water sit nearby as he plays with the two red-nosed brindles.

If he was forced to choose between his dogs and a cool place to stay, Murphy says the last thing he would do is leave his dogs behind.

“I don’t give up on them. I had friends, I had family,” Murphy says. “There’s no one but the dogs, man. They are faithful.

Fugate says KC Pet Project occasionally visits homeless camps to administer people with their pets. They were even able to give people shelter vouchers if their animals were vaccinated.

But getting them to surrender their animals is another story.

Kansas City homelessness prevention coordinator Josh Henges says programs like Home Away from Home are just fixes. A competitive housing market makes it almost impossible for anyone with dogs to find housing, especially for people coming out of homelessness.

“We are losing this battle because we do everything the same way,” Henges said. ” It needs to change. And in that change there will be pain, discomfort and frustration.

“And it starts with stuff like that,” he adds.

Dulin says he suggested that Murphy place his dogs in foster care while he tries to find permanent housing and full-time employment.

“He literally broke down and started crying,” Dulin says. “He would rather go without the services he needs before giving them up for adoption or whatever.”

Murphy gets emotional when talking about his dogs, or even alluding to the suggestion to give them up. He says he has no interest in using the temporary care program at KC Pet Project.

“That’s not loyalty,” he said, looking at the two dogs at his feet. “They didn’t pawn me.”

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New Truckstop.com survey reveals benefits of bringing pets to work https://jolijaunter.com/new-truckstop-com-survey-reveals-benefits-of-bringing-pets-to-work/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/new-truckstop-com-survey-reveals-benefits-of-bringing-pets-to-work/ In a survey conducted earlier this year*, Truckstop.com found that more than two-thirds (67%) of American professional truck drivers felt pressure to work longer hours and 55% worried about the future of the truck. trucking industry. future, when discussing their concerns about driver shortages. According to a more recent survey by Truckstop.com**, professional truckers travel […]]]>

In a survey conducted earlier this year*, Truckstop.com found that more than two-thirds (67%) of American professional truck drivers felt pressure to work longer hours and 55% worried about the future of the truck. trucking industry. future, when discussing their concerns about driver shortages.

According to a more recent survey by Truckstop.com**, professional truckers travel with their pets on the road more often (56%), with 66% of respondents saying it’s for companionship and 19% for support emotional.

Truckstop.com Customers Mary and Johnny Gaskins Yellow Labrador, Oscar, was rescued from the trash outside a breakfast restaurant in Vanceboro, North Carolina when he was only six weeks old.

“It was love at first sight, and I couldn’t believe anyone would do such a thing to an innocent puppy,” said Mary Gaskins. “We take it everywhere – it has improved our way of life. When you’re on the road it’s stressful and you sit for hours. Oscar makes me get out of the truck during rest stops and walk and helps ease the stress of what can be a very stressful job.We may have saved him, but it turns out he saved us.

Customer Kristy Kramer is a freight broker based in Warren, Mich. and his miniature Golden Doodle, Baylee Jeannot only sits quietly with her in her home office during working hours, but is also a therapy dog ​​in training.

Baylee Jean gave my son and me a new life,” said Kristy Kramer. “My son has epilepsy and ADHD – Baylee can sense when he needs comfort and will lay on top of him to create the feeling of a weighted blanket. I was inspired to get her certified as a therapy dog ​​in because of its natural instinct for comfort and after seeing how dogs can brighten the day for those in recovery centers.”

Other survey results show that most professional truck drivers who travel with their pet would reconsider their profession if they couldn’t take their pet with them on the road (54%). Truckers who take their pet on the road for emotional support are the most likely to reconsider their profession if they couldn’t travel with their pet (64%).

After two years of industry instability and now facing unprecedented fuel costs, these pet passengers are making all the difference. Luckily, for many carriers, National Take Your Pet to Work Week is a treat they enjoy on a regular basis.

To see more customer testimonials and photos, please visit our Facebook page, https://facebook.com/truckstopdotcom. For more information on how Truckstop.com strengthens the freight community, visit https://truckstop.com.

About Truckstop.com

Truckstop.com is a trusted partner for carriers, brokers and shippers. It empowers the freight community with a platform of innovative solutions for the entire freight lifecycle to increase efficiency, automate processes and accelerate growth. As one of the largest industry-neutral freight marketplaces, Truckstop.com provides customer service and a range of quality loads and trucks to give customers of all sizes, whether on the road or in the office, transparency and the freedom to build lasting relationships. and grow their businesses. To learn how Truckstop.com helps move the freight community forward, visit https://truckstop.com.

Methodology

*Survey carried out, on behalf of Truckstop.com, by Censuswide. 504 U.S. truck drivers (aged 21+) who are carriers (a person or business that does the shipping and handling of freight loads) surveyed between 24.02.202228.02.2022. Censuswide respects and employs members of the Market Research Society, which is based on ESOMAR principles.

**Survey conducted by Truckstop.com. 694 U.S. truck drivers and employees of companies that ship and handle cargo surveyed between 15.06.202217.06.2022.

Media Contact:
Nicole Worley
Truckstop.com
[email protected]

SOURCE Truckstop Group LLC

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Montgomery Humane Society warns against leaving pets in hot cars https://jolijaunter.com/montgomery-humane-society-warns-against-leaving-pets-in-hot-cars/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:37:00 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/montgomery-humane-society-warns-against-leaving-pets-in-hot-cars/ MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA) – For many people, pets are like family and you don’t want to lose them. That’s why the Montgomery Humane Society warns against leaving pets in hot cars. “I can’t tell you how many times we’ve pulled dead dogs out of cars due to overheating,” executive director Steven Tears said. “They shut […]]]>

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA) – For many people, pets are like family and you don’t want to lose them. That’s why the Montgomery Humane Society warns against leaving pets in hot cars.

“I can’t tell you how many times we’ve pulled dead dogs out of cars due to overheating,” executive director Steven Tears said. “They shut down that engine and the heat is starting to rise.”

Even a few minutes can be too much.

“We love our dogs, but sometimes the best thing for them is to leave them at home,” Tears said.

It’s not just the cars. With this intense heat wave, it can still be dangerous to leave your pets outside for too long.

The shelter wants owners to bring their cats and dogs inside during peak hours of the day.

“Let them spend the day in the crate,” he said. “When you come home, when the sun has settled on the trees, let them out.”

There are also precautions to take before putting on a leash and going for a walk. You will want to make sure your dog is well hydrated by providing plenty of water.

Before walking, owners can touch the pavement with their hand to ensure that it is not too hot for a pet’s paw.

“There’s this old joke about you can fry an egg there,” Tears added. “We don’t allow dogs here to go out on asphalt, road or concrete.”

Instead, stay on the grass if you must go out. It’s simply the best for your pet.

Copyright 2022 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

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17 Pets Adopted During Founder’s Day Adopt-A-Thon https://jolijaunter.com/17-pets-adopted-during-founders-day-adopt-a-thon/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:41:42 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/17-pets-adopted-during-founders-day-adopt-a-thon/ PANAMA CITY, Fla. (WMBB) — Each year, Nexstar’s 199 television stations dedicate their time and energy to a community service project. We call it Founder’s Day of Caring, and this year we’re partnering with Bay County Animal Control and Operation Spay Bay to host a Pet Adopt-A-Thon. Bay County Shelter cats and dogs had a […]]]>

PANAMA CITY, Fla. (WMBB) — Each year, Nexstar’s 199 television stations dedicate their time and energy to a community service project.

We call it Founder’s Day of Caring, and this year we’re partnering with Bay County Animal Control and Operation Spay Bay to host a Pet Adopt-A-Thon.

Bay County Shelter cats and dogs had a chance to run and play Adopt-A-Thon.

Some furry friends have even left the shelter with a new owner.

Bay County Animal Control Administrative Assistant Serina Junger said their goal is to find homes for the animals as quickly as possible.

“We need to move our adoptions around to give us more room for additional animals to come in. Once our facility is full, we have to ask people to keep their animals a little longer until they have room. Each adopted animal opens up another space for another animal to come in and have the opportunity to return home for adoption,” Junger said.

Junger said they receive about 30 new animals at the shelter each week.

Operation Spay Bay Maxine Cornette said events like this are a chance to educate people on the importance of spaying and neutering their pets.

“Please sterilize and sterilize. Recorded euthanasias in this country are around 50 million,” Cornette said. “We were euthanizing far too many pets, it’s really important. Spay and spay. All of these babies would have homes if we just spayed our pets.

The cost to adopt a cat or dog is $25.

This includes neutering or neutering, vaccinations, microchipping, and flea and heartworm treatments.

Prior to Friday’s Adop-A-Thon, the shelter was filled with more than 50 animals.

About half of them found a new forever home during our event. A total of 17 pets were adopted on Friday, 12 dogs and five cats.

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State-of-the-art facility offers the latest options for pets https://jolijaunter.com/state-of-the-art-facility-offers-the-latest-options-for-pets/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/state-of-the-art-facility-offers-the-latest-options-for-pets/ By Anthony Richards The Palm Valley Veterinary Center and Dr. Louis Mack want to bring the best care to pets in the Ponte Vedra area and a big step has been taken to achieve this with the official opening of the business and the inauguration ceremony with the St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce May […]]]>

By Anthony Richards

The Palm Valley Veterinary Center and Dr. Louis Mack want to bring the best care to pets in the Ponte Vedra area and a big step has been taken to achieve this with the official opening of the business and the inauguration ceremony with the St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce May 31.

One of the main ways Mack hopes to achieve its goal of providing the best service is by offering some of the latest state-of-the-art technology and procedures in the facility.

“It was originally a bank that was vacant for a while,” Mack said. “I kept getting a bigger and bigger project because I wanted to keep adding better features and more services.”

Recent renovations included adding approximately 6,000 square feet to the original structure.

“I wanted to add whatever I could to meet the needs of this area, as many hospitals in this area are in strip centers or smaller in nature,” Mack said. “It makes it difficult to provide everything I would like to provide.”


The decision to develop the location was not made in haste, as it took years to get there.

“It all started in 2015, when I moved here from the Ocala area after being originally from San Diego, California,” Mack said. “Before that, I had sold my practice and worked for a company as a medical director. I saw a lot of hospitals that had what I thought were flaws.

After getting an idea of ​​the needs that were out there, he decided to get back into business and have his own practice because he knew that was the best way to make a difference.

Some eight years later, and his dream center is now a reality that he is now able to share with the audience he intended.

“It’s exciting, but it’s just the beginning,” Mack said with a smile on his face.

Making sure to maximize the technology available to vets these days has always been at the top of his list.

These advanced features include a veterinary hyperbaric chamber, which Mack says is one of the few in the northeast Florida area.

“It’s a device that basically allows you to bathe the dog in pressurized oxygen that forces it into the cells and the plasma, so the body is then hyper-oxygenated,” Mack said. “It sounds rare, but oxygen is actually the source of healing and many of our body’s functions. It can often treat chronic or acute conditions that otherwise wouldn’t respond to traditional therapy.”

The method has become more common among humans in recent years, especially among athletes, as it helps them in their recovery process.

Another aspect that Mack prides itself on is the ability to maintain a personal and comfortable atmosphere for every animal that enters the facility.

One of the main ways to limit animal stress levels is to have separate collection and holding areas for dogs and cats, and even try to group dogs with similar personality traits together.

“The goal is to provide a comfortable, low-stress environment, and hopefully we’ve achieved that,” Mack said.

Where the use of the latest technology comes into play most is in terms of how efficiently information is relayed throughout the building, which can result in the diagnosis and treatment of a pet in time. timely.

“The whole hospital is powered by a full generator, which means that at any time during a power outage, we’re never out of power, which is very important,” Mack said.

Monitors are in almost every room and can easily provide information that they can then share and educate owners about their pets.

“When people can see the importance you place on doing your best for animals, I think that means a lot,” Mack said.


The center is open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays and from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. It is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday and closed on Sunday.

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Lawmakers go to bat for abandoned and seized animals | News, Sports, Jobs https://jolijaunter.com/lawmakers-go-to-bat-for-abandoned-and-seized-animals-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 06:32:36 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/lawmakers-go-to-bat-for-abandoned-and-seized-animals-news-sports-jobs/ ALBANY — Abandoned and abused dogs and cats will see their conditions improve at shelters and rescue organizations thanks to legislation approved at the Statehouse, advocates for the humane treatment of animals say. “It will raise the standards for shelter and rescue at all levels,” said Libby Post, executive director of the New […]]]>

ALBANY — Abandoned and abused dogs and cats will see their conditions improve at shelters and rescue organizations thanks to legislation approved at the Statehouse, advocates for the humane treatment of animals say.

“It will raise the standards for shelter and rescue at all levels,” said Libby Post, executive director of the New York State Animal Protection Federation. The organization advocates for animal shelters statewide.

Proponents of the measure say it is designed to ensure animals who need it most receive the best care while waiting to be adopted.

It will take shelters and rescues to ensure they provide safe and humane conditions, with proper feeding, veterinary care and cleaning.

“This is one of the most important pieces of legislation for animal shelters and rescues,” said Stacie Haynes, president of the federation and director of the Susquehanna SPCA near Cooperstown.

The legislation was overwhelmingly approved in the Senate and State Assembly in the final days of the 2022 legislative session.

“What this does is create a level playing field for everyone to meet a set of standards developed by the Association of Shelter Veterinarians,” Post said.

The Federation’s Companion Animal Capital Fund, which has attracted some $28 million in public funding in recent years, is expected to help shelters and rescue organizations meet the new standards when they come into effect in three years.

Post said the timeline for implementing the standards will allow organizations plenty of time to make the changes and improvements needed to pass upcoming state inspections.

The Federation’s education fund received $147,000 from the state to help shelters and rescues understand the standards required by the legislation.

“We don’t leave people out in the cold”, Post said. “We will be with them every step of the way to help them provide the best care for homeless pets.”

Proponents began pushing for the new standards more than a decade ago.

Given the strong support the measure received from lawmakers, Post said she was optimistic it would be signed into law once Governor Kathy Hochul considers it.

The legislation would require all shelters to be licensed and supervised by the state Department of Agriculture and Markets. Inspections would be carried out by the agency’s animal industry division.

The state bureaucracy is already involved in regulating dog licensing and setting standards for the humane care of seized pets, as well as inspecting municipal shelters.

While that state agency would likely need to hire additional inspectors, Post said the department would see one mission — inspecting the conditions of pets in pet stores — scaled back following the adoption this year of a measure prohibiting the sale of dogs, cats and rabbits in these retail outlets.

She said her organization will seek to convince lawmakers next year to ensure agriculture and markets receive adequate funding in the state budget.

The main sponsors of the measure are Congresswoman Amy Paulin, D-Westchester County, and Senator Joseph Addabbo, D-Queens.

“So many of our homes and families have been blessed with the companionship of a loving animal,” said Paulina. “It’s wonderful to now be a little closer to ensuring they receive the high level of care they deserve. »



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‘Breeding Faster Than We Can Save’: Responsible UK Ferret Owners Wanted | Pets https://jolijaunter.com/breeding-faster-than-we-can-save-responsible-uk-ferret-owners-wanted-pets/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 14:07:00 +0000 https://jolijaunter.com/breeding-faster-than-we-can-save-responsible-uk-ferret-owners-wanted-pets/ OWhen Angela Taylor was called to help three pregnant ferrets abandoned in a crate in a stranger’s garden, one of them was already in labor. “His kits didn’t survive,” says Taylor, who has run Chase Ferret Rescue in Derbyshire for more than 20 years, “but the other two had six babies, which is a lot […]]]>

OWhen Angela Taylor was called to help three pregnant ferrets abandoned in a crate in a stranger’s garden, one of them was already in labor. “His kits didn’t survive,” says Taylor, who has run Chase Ferret Rescue in Derbyshire for more than 20 years, “but the other two had six babies, which is a lot of mouths to feed and then find a foyer.”

Now that the summer breeding season has arrived, animal welfare groups are reporting a massive influx of lost, stray or abandoned ferrets, often pregnant jills (females) whose owners cannot cope with extra kits, or hobs (males) who have gathered their notorious evasion skills to go in search of a mate. Inevitably, the impact of confinement on the ownership of pets is also felt: “They reproduce faster than we can save them”, sighs Taylor.

The Scottish SPCA launched an appeal to potential ferret owners last week, after an influx of fluffy mustelids into its shelters. There are at least 50 ferret protection and rescue organizations across the UK, many of which are run by a few committed people who rely on local fundraising, and they are ‘full to bursting’, warns Caroline Hornberger of the Heart of England Ferret Association in Droitwich.

“They’re amazing animals, but they’re not for everyone,” says Hornberger, who spends weekends visiting galas and parties to educate the public about ferrets and their ownership. “We always advise new owners not to buy kits, but to bring adults from a rescue center where they have been socialized and handled.”

During lockdown there was a spike in breeding, she says, with owners recognizing the demand and needing a source of income – but selling kits for a ten each perpetuates the idea that ferrets are a “disposable commodity”.

Far fewer people continue to work ferrets to hunt rabbits these days, says Mick Quelch of the National Ferret Welfare Society, but there remains a class of dedicated enthusiasts who attend shows and races who are now gearing up for their first summer events. since the pandemic. “They revel in silverware and rosettes, they are real specialists who want to get rid of this myth of the stinky, biting, trouser-pulling ferret, and show how beautiful they are when cared for. them properly.”

Unfortunately, he adds, there are those who can’t or won’t sterilize their animals, raising them unnecessarily “to make a quick buck”. And there are also those who acquire what they imagine to be an easy pet, not appreciating the specific care they need, such as daily handling to prevent them from becoming aggressive, vigilance in hot weather because they do not sweat, as well as often consistent care. veterinary bills.

A significant challenge for ferret owners is how to best manage them during the breeding season: these animals are induced ovulators, which means that unless they are bred or given medication hormonal, they cannot go out of season, which can be fatal. During the pandemic, ‘jill jabs’, as they are called, were difficult to organize, amid fears that neutering could increase the risk of adrenal disease, all against the backdrop of escalating veterinary bills.

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Robert Morrison, animal care assistant at the Scottish SPCA’s Aberdeenshire centre, who currently has nine resident ferrets, including a jill who just had a litter of seven, remains a strong advocate for ownership: “It’s just about making research first.

“Yes, they do smell bad, but if you stay on top of it, it’s fine. They’re used to being in groups, so it’s good to have a pair, but make sure they have some room to climb in high and wide cages: they love to explore and go through tunnels.

“Ferrets are brilliant pets; they are really sociable and very intelligent and they thrive on interaction with their owner. Learn to handle them well and they won’t get snappy. And after a play, they’ll be happy to snuggle up in your lap.

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