Florida shelters transport pets out of state after Hurricane Ian

Shelters in South Florida are working to transport shelter animals from the storm-ravaged West Coast to other states to help them get adopted. shelters affected by Hurricane Ian. So far they have taken animals to Chicago, Michigan and Indiana. “Florida has a reasonably high euthanasia rate, primarily for cats, but animals still lose their lives here more than in some other states; especially in the northeast,” Martin said. According to the data, Florida ranks among the five worst states in terms of euthanasia. Martin said transporting animals out of state is critical because most shelters in Florida are constantly operating at capacity. the 30-day wandering hold that pets are on once they’re in a storm-affected shelter. “It’s all because of what happened during Katrina,” Martin explained. “Everyone wanted to help when Katrina hit and they came down to New Orleans, and they moved the animals out of state very quickly, which made it difficult for people to find their pets.” While Martin said the 30-day detention helps more families reunite with their pets, it can present a challenge for shelters. “We have a 30 day detention in a shelter, which is usually 5 days,” she said. “So when you take that 5-day wait and turn it into a 30-day wait, you immediately hit space constraints.” These stresses are what Florida shelters, including Furry Friends, are working to alleviate by taking expired detainees. “It’s those who are most at risk that we’re trying to move,” she said. Martin said that no matter how healthy a small dog is, he will always be adopted before a big dog. “If you walk through our shelter or any shelter in any county in Florida, the same faces are looking at you and it’s basically 40+ pound dogs waiting for homes,” he said. she said. or adopt is by donating money, according to Furry Friends. “We want these little lives to be saved, but there are expenses involved,” Martin said. , Click here.

South Florida shelters are working to transport animals from shelters across the storm-ravaged west coast to other states to help them get adopted.

Mary Martin, Chief Operating Officer of Furry friends in Jupitersaid so far they have removed about 200 animals from shelters impacted by Hurricane Ian.

So far they have taken animals to Chicago, Michigan and Indiana.

“Florida has a reasonably high euthanasia rate, primarily for cats, but animals still lose their lives here more than in some other states; especially in the northeast,” Martin said.

According DataFlorida ranks among the five worst states in terms of euthanasia.

Martin said transporting animals out of state is essential because most shelters in Florida are constantly operating at capacity.

Another complication is working with the 30-day stray restraint that pets are on once they’re in a storm-affected shelter.

“This all happened because of what happened during Katrina,” Martin explained. “Everyone wanted to help when Katrina hit and they came down to New Orleans, and they moved the animals out of state really quickly, which made it difficult for people to find their pets.”

Although Martin said the 30-day suspension helps more families find their pets, it can pose a challenge for shelters.

“We have a 30 day detention in a shelter, which is usually 5 days,” she said. “So when you take that 5-day detention and turn it into a 30-day detention, you immediately hit space constraints.”

These constraints are what shelters across Florida, including Furry Friends, are working to alleviate by taking in animals whose stray hold has expired.

“It’s those who are most at risk that we’re trying to move,” she said.

Martin said that no matter how healthy a small dog is, he will always be adopted before a big dog.

“If you walk through our shelter or any shelter in any county in Florida, the same faces are looking at you and it’s basically 40+ pound dogs waiting for homes,” she said. .

According to Furry Friends, the best way for the public to get involved, if they are unable to foster or adopt, is to donate money.

“We want these little lives saved, but there are expenses involved,” Martin said.

To donate to Furry Friends, click here.

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